History Group Talks August 2016


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                                                        Tavistock vs Taj Mahal by Andrew Thompson
The question is: Why is Tavistock so significant to have World Heritage status?  It is Devon’s only World Heritage site.
Andrew went on to explain why professionals in world heritage feel justified in making this claim.  He gave us an insight into the process of how a site can gain the title World Heritage.
The word ‘heritage’ has to be broken down into ‘tangible’ heritage which is the physical remains of the past, i.e. Cotehele House and ‘intangible’ heritage which is customs and behaviours, i.e. Widecombe Fair.  On many occasions these two join by using the past in the present.
The values/significance of ‘heritage’ are listed as:
• Aesthetic
• Historical
• Educational and academic
• Environment
• Recreational
• Cultural
Nominating a site for World Heritage status follows a process of:
• Tentative list
• Nomination file
• Advisory body
• World Heritage Committee
• Selection Criteria
A nomination must have outstanding universal value plus meet at least one of ten of the selection criteria.  The significance of the site must be so great that it transcends political and religious status.
Andrew gave a brief outline of the Cornish Mining World Heritage explaining that Tavistock matters as a product of mining.   Tavistock has the best group of surviving foundry buildings in the world. 
Tavistock has three key attributes for World Heritage status:
 Mining settlement (best example of metal mining town in Europe)
 Transport infrastructure (canal – global firsts in building the canal)
 Foundry buildings
On Saturday, following the talk, 27 of us enjoyed exploring Tavistock with Andrew as our Guide.  Andrew produced maps of 1750 Tavistock and using those he then took us around to show just how much history still can be seen and how much is now hidden underground.  A really interesting 2 hours.

Tavistock vs Taj Mahal by Andrew Thompson
The question is: Why is Tavistock so significant to have World Heritage status?  It is Devon’s only World Heritage site.
Andrew went on to explain why professionals in world heritage feel justified in making this claim.  He gave us an insight into the process of how a site can gain the title World Heritage.
The word ‘heritage’ has to be broken down into ‘tangible’ heritage which is the physical remains of the past, i.e. Cotehele House and ‘intangible’ heritage which is customs and behaviours, i.e. Widecombe Fair.  On many occasions these two join by using the past in the present.
The values/significance of ‘heritage’ are listed as:
• Aesthetic
• Historical
• Educational and academic
• Environment
• Recreational
• Cultural
Nominating a site for World Heritage status follows a process of:
• Tentative list
• Nomination file
• Advisory body
• World Heritage Committee
• Selection Criteria
A nomination must have outstanding universal value plus meet at least one of ten of the selection criteria.  The significance of the site must be so great that it transcends political and religious status.
Andrew gave a brief outline of the Cornish Mining World Heritage explaining that Tavistock matters as a product of mining.   Tavistock has the best group of surviving foundry buildings in the world. 
Tavistock has three key attributes for World Heritage status:
 Mining settlement (best example of metal mining town in Europe)
 Transport infrastructure (canal – global firsts in building the canal)
 Foundry buildings
On Saturday, following the talk, 27 of us enjoyed exploring Tavistock with Andrew as our Guide.  Andrew produced maps of 1750 Tavistock and using those he then took us around to show just how much history still can be seen and how much is now hidden underground.  A really interesting 2 hours.

 

 


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